2018 Eco-Speaker Series

Eco-Speaker Series

Friday September 7 @ Glen Foerd on the Delaware
Grant Ave. & Milnor St., Philadelphia, PA  19114  

7:15 pm Kirk Wattles, “The Plague of the Spotted Lantern Fly”  Street Tree Management Div., Urban Forestry, City of Philadelphia

kirkA long-time gardener and student of natural history, Kirk took up beekeeping eight years ago and now has upwards of 4-5 colonies of bees. In recent years he has been helping with the Philadelphia Beekeepers Guild’s “Bees and Trees” project, investigating what we all can do to boost bee forage and improve the natural habitat for bees and related species in our area. Currently working for Philadelphia Parks and Recreation as a tree identification specialist, Kirk also is an admin for the Facebook page Spotted Lanternfly Watch.

7:30 pm  Pouné Saberi, M.D. “The Difference Between Night & Day”

pouneIncreased nighttime illumination has disruptive consequences for all forms of life: plants and animals: pollinators and humans alike.  Studies have shown that light pollution unravels the intertwined tapestry of day and night pollinators, that it speeds up the circadian rhythm of birds and other city dwellers, like us!  Dr. Saberi, M.D. from Physicians for Social Responsibility explains in simple terms, the 2017 Nobel Prize-winning research into the Circadian Clock Gene.

 

Saturday September 8 @ Wyck Historic House | Garden | Farm
6026 Germantown Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19144 

11:00 am Kirk Wattles, “The Plague of the Spotted Lantern Fly”
kirkHear how beekeepers are in a unique position to stop the coming scourge.  If you see something, say something!  Currently working for Philadelphia Parks and Recreation as a tree identification specialist, Kirk also is an admin for the Facebook page Spotted Lanternfly Watch.

11:15 am Helena van Vliet  “Healthy City – Urban Habitat”
helenaAbundant wild nature in the city is good for us! With Helena van Vliet(American Institute of ArchitectsBioPhilly founding member, Biophilic Cities steering committee), let’s explore the deep connection between human health and urban biodiversity.  She will talk about building symbiotic relationships in and for the resilient biophilic city of the future.

1:00 pm Joshua Huff  “How 800 Hives Sustain the Huff Brothers’ Families”
joshJosh and his brother, Sam, own and operate Huff’s Honey Farm in Trout Run, PA.  They maintain approximately 800 colonies in north-central PA, specializing in honey production and the sale of nucleus colonies (small colonies of their hardy livestock, used by other beekeepers to start up new hives).  Josh is a Pennsylvania native, a Marine Corps veteran, and a Penn State graduate with an Engineering degree.  He worked as an engineer for 10+ years, then decided corporate life wasn’t for him and that keeping bees with his brother was a better path.

2:30pm Kirk Wattles, “The Plague of the Spotted Lantern Fly”

kirkHear how beekeepers are in a unique position to stop the coming scourge.  If you see something, say something!  Currently working for Philadelphia Parks and Recreation as a tree identification specialist, Kirk also is an admin for the Facebook page Spotted Lanternfly Watch.  Kirk will reprise his morning presentation.  Join him now if you missed the earlier talk.

3:00 pm Doug Sponsler, Ph. D.  “The Role of Bees (& Beekeepers) in an Urban Ecology”
dougDoug is a Philadelphia native of the Oxford Circle and Roxboro neighborhoods. He studied biology at Cedarville University in Ohio and went on to do a PhD. in entomology at Ohio State University.  Currently, Doug is a postdoctoral scholar in Penn State University’s Center for Pollinator Research. Doug’s research, teaching, and outreach concentrate especially on urban systems, and the direction of his work is toward a holistic urban community ecology set in the broader context of socioeconomics, food systems, and environmental justice.  His current work includes a study of pollinator foraging ecology in urban Philadelphia.

 

Sunday September 9 @ Bartram’s Garden
5400 Lindbergh Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19143

11:30 am Kirk Wattles, “The Plague of the Spotted Lantern Fly”
kirk Hear how beekeepers are in a unique position to stop the coming scourge.  If you see something, say something!  Currently working for Philadelphia Parks and Recreation as a tree identification specialist, Kirk also is an admin for the Facebook page Spotted Lanternfly Watch.

12:00 noon Samuel Omar Torres “History of Apiculture: From Honey Hunters to Modern Beekeeping”
NOTE:  This talk has been cancelled due to a family emergency.  We apologize for any inconvenience. 
samSam will talk about humans’ first encounters with honey bees and the transition into domestication.  Attendees will get to see what it was like to keep bees as far back as ancient Egypt all the way up to present day.  Sam Torres studied horticulture at Temple University.  While there, he learned how to keep bees through his mentor Professor Vincent Aloyo who is an EAS-certified Master Beekeeper.  It has been 6 years since Sam started keeping bees and he is the proud owner/operator of Keystone Colonies Beekeeping Company in Philadelphia.  Sam looks forward to perfecting his craft for the rest of his life!

1:30 pm Kimberly Douglas “The Philly Pollinators’ Corridor”
kimWhen greenspace is broken up by stretches of asphalt and cement, pollinators with short flight ranges are confined to small patches of habitat.  But when we create adjacent oases of habitat, these pollinators can make their way across the city, resting and refueling as they journey.  Kim will discuss the process by which her team is planning – with input from the southwest Philly community – a greenway designed especially for pollinators.  We will get a glimpse of the proposed outcome and learn how/when it will be implemented.

 

 

 

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